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2nd Binational MAREMIS Meeting between Rostock and Singapore

in Research, Partnering by

Over the past two days, FleetMon hosted the second bi-national meeting of our MAREMIS research project here in Rostock. Together with our project partners from IHPC in Singapore, we are developing machine learning-based models and a demonstrator to measure, track, and validate emissions-related aspects of maritime transport to reduce emissions from ships. See what we have achieved so far.

Thanks for joining our meeting at the FleetMon headquarters. ©FleetMon
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FleetMon in Research: Techno-Economic Feasibility of Green Ammonia as a Fuel for the Maritime Fleet

in Research, Partnering by

Transparency and greener shipping are two of our most important goals at FleetMon. Therefore we support students, universities and institutions in their maritime research projects with AIS data. More than 120 universities are part of our cooperation partners – one is Oxford University. In 2022, Daniel Bundred, a MEng student from the Department of Engineering, contacted us and requested AIS data for his project on decarbonizing global shipping.

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First Public Global Fleet Emission Calculation available with FleetMon

in Decarbonization, Updates, Site Updates, Trends by

With the upcoming regulations of the World Climate Council and the recently enacted requirements of the IMO, providing information about the CO2 emissions of vessels is now essential for operators and owners of cargo, ro-pax, and cruise ships.
With FleetMon’s CO2 emission calculation, you can obtain precise information about the merchant fleet emissions with just a few clicks and display them retroactively for up to 180 days.

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Cape Horn – The Most Dangerous Passage in The World

in Maritime Knowledge by

Old sailor saying:

“Below the 40th parallel, there is no law. Below the 50th parallel, there is no God.”

Cape Horn, the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago is located at 56 degrees south latitude, making a circumnavigation of Cape Horn particularly difficult. At Cape Horn, the Atlantic and Pacific oceans meet – and that’s what made the circumnavigation such a challenge. Extreme low-pressure systems swirl across the sea, creating the dreaded williwaw winds. These gusts come suddenly, frequently, and are unpredictable – and with bigger winds come bigger waves. To sail from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the only sea route was around Cape Horn. The Strait of Magellan was difficult to pass because of the wind and current conditions.

Hornos Island in FleetMon Explorer
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Phrases of Maritime Origin and Their Meaning

in Maritime Knowledge by

There are plenty of phrases we have integrated into our daily use of language so that we no longer even know where they actually come from and what meaning they originally had. We would like to introduce to you seven sayings of maritime origin and explain their meaning.

Sailing under a false flag

This refers to deceptive maneuvers or covert operations conducted by another third party to conceal identity. The action is thus actively attributed to an uninvolved third party for appearances. The actual actor is thereby acting “under a false flag.” In English, the much-publicized deceptive maneuver is also called “sailing under false colors,” while a courageous flagger is sailing with true colors.

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