Category "Updates"

IMMRA Risk Report Report May 2018

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During May 2018 1,777 Oil & Gas vessels were assessed by IMRRA.
100 vessels with 784 deficiencies were identified as vessels with poor PSC Inspection results (equal to five or more deficiencies),
and 16 vessels were detained.

IMRRA’s May 2018 Data Summary

May
Tanker screenings 1,777
Vessels Assessed DWT 94, 573, 785
Above Ave. Risk Rating Vessels 575
Below Risk Rating Vessels 1,202
Average Risk Rating 34%
Minimum Vessel Risk Rating 20%
Maximum Risk Rating 64%
Casualty Incidents (from screenings) 27
Vessels with 5 or more PSC deficiencies 100
Total Deficiencies 784
Detentions Assessed 16

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Oakland woman part of mariners’ new guard

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Gastcomment from columnist Carl Nolte:

It wasn’t long ago that the maritime industry was a man’s world. It was part of the culture in book, movies, songs an legends. The sea captains, sailors, explorers, naval heroes, even the pirates were all men. It was ingrained in the language: seaman, helmsman, fisherman, longshoreman, yachtsman.

The World has changed in recent years. Now there are female admirals, ship captains, ferry skippers, deckhands, marine engineers, maritime executives. At the end of the last year, Maria Secchitano of San Francisco defeated two men to be elected national president of the Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific, which represents ferry and tugboat workers. She is the first female head of a seagoing labor organization.

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e-mobility at sea – the future now in Finland

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Electric road vehicles are slowly but surely making progress. According to figures published by the International Energy Agency worldwide sales were up by 40% in 2016. But an electric-powered ship – isn’t that technically impossible? A few years ago, we would have agreed, but advances in electric power storage and generation have made this emission-free dream come true – in Finland, for example. A 525-ton ferry with the appropriate name ELEKTRA (shown on the picture) is now transporting up to 375 passengers and 90 cars through the islets off the Finnish port of Turku. The batteries for this Finferries vessel were manufactured by Siemens, a company with a long tradition in electric-powered vessels with the first one built as long ago as 1886! In the Norwegian city of Trondheim Siemens employs more than 1,000 people in the development and construction of electric-powered fishing vessels, working boats and ferries. Siemens built the world’s first e-ferry, the AMPERE, in 2015 and is currently expanding its battery production facility in Trondheim.

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Tracking CO2 emissions – mandatory since 1 January

in Decarbonization, Updates, Trends by

On 1 January 2018 a new and mandatory dimension was added to fleet tracking: ship owners are now obliged to monitor CO2 emissions for ships exceeding 5,000 gross tons. There are good reasons.

International shipping is the only means of transportation not included in the EU’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. So monitoring CO2 emissions from ships makes environmental sense. In November 2017 an agreement was reached between the European Parliament and Council to establish a mechanism for monitoring, reporting and verifying maritime emissions. The aim of the new regulation is to improve the level of information about maritime CO2 emissions with respect to ships’ fuel consumption, transport work and energy efficiency. This will enable emissions trends and ship performance to be analysed. And in the longer term, the data gathered will allow the EU to “play an influential role in the negotiations within the International Maritime Organisation, with a view to finding ambitious solutions that combine environmental protection with development”, as Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Environment Minister recently said.

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FleetMon wins special Digital Technology Prize

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At FleetMon we’re very proud to have been recently awarded the first-ever Digital Technology Prize at the annual Ludwig Bülkow Technology Awards ceremony. The significance of this award can be seen, not least, in its name giver. Ludwig Bülkow was an aeronautical pioneer whose many achievements included Germany’s first jet fighter and an innovative helicopter rotorhead. As Ludwig Bülkow was also a native of what is now Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, this German state decided to name its Technology Awards after one of its most famous sons.

 

News extract from the NDR report.

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EMERALD STAR sinks – liquefaction the cause?

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The sinking of the EMERALD STAR in stormy seas off in the Philippine Sea on October 13 ( https://www.fleetmon.com/maritime-news/2017/20043/bulk-carrier-emerald-star-reported-capsized-and-sa/ ) has once again raised the issue of liquefaction as a high risk factor for bulk carriers. The EMERALD STAR was sailing from Indonesia to China with a cargo of nickel ore. There is little doubt that liquefaction was the main cause of the ship capsizing, as the circumstances are similar to the sinking of the BULK JUPITER some years ago. In such tragic situations one question has to be asked: Did the Master of the EMERALD STAR know the true moisture content of his cargo? He would have been entitled to refuse loading or sailing if he believed the cargo was dangerous. But how was he to know?

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Disaster averted – GLORY AMSTERDAM was driven onto sandbank

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In one of the worst storms for a while in the German Bight the 225-metre bulk carrier GLORY AMSTERDAM was driven onto a sandbank some two kilometres off the East Frisian island of Langeoog on 29 October. The ship had been anchored off Helgoland but the winds and waves of “Storm Herwart” proved too strong for the ship’s moorings.

GLORY AMSTERDAM: https://www.fleetmon.com/vessels/glory-amsterdam_9287182_37635/

glory-amsterdam_9287182_1390299-940x1000

Though not carrying any cargo, the 11-year-old bulk carrier did have some 1,800 tonnes of marine diesel on board and environmental activists were seriously concerned about a possible spillage polluting the mudflats of the Wadden Sea, a UN Cultural Heritage Site. Concerns about the ship’s structural stability only grew when repeated attempts to pull the GLORY AMSTERDAM off the sandbank at high tide failed. The specialists from Rotterdam-based Smit Salvage knew they had just one last card to play. If that attempt failed, the oil would have to be pumped out and the bulk carrier broken up where it lay stranded – a precarious task in an ecologically sensitive environment.

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FleetMon CEO speaks on transport safety at German Mobility Congress

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Mobility is a major issue in Germany – not just due to its geographical location at the crossroads of Europe but also because it is one of the world’s leading export nations, which makes it highly dependent on maritime mobility. The keynote theme of the upcoming German Mobility Congress is networked mobility and FleetMon CEO Lars Brandstäter will be one of four experts on a panel discussing safe transport networks. 

FleetMon CEO speaks on transport safety at German Mobility Congress

Networked mobility is at the very heart of the FleetMon service portfolio. After all, its AIS-based vessel tracking service informs customers about the precise movements of any ships they are interested in – anywhere in the world. “I was delighted to accept the invitation to join a panel discussion at the German Mobility Congress because FleetMon plays a key role in enabling safe transport networks at sea,” Lars Brandstaeter says. The FleetMon CEO will join Hans-Hilmar Rischke, Head of Safety at Deutsche Bahn, Mechthild Stöwer, Head of the Security Management Department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Safe Information Technology, and Prof. Dr. Stefan Pickl from the RISK Centre of the Federal Armed Forces’ University in Munich on the panel that will address key networked transport issues. Up to 400 attendees are expected at this event.

The Germany Mobility Congress is taking place at the House of Logistics and Mobility (HOLM) in Frankfurt/Main from October 4-6 (www.deutscher-mobilitaetskongress.de).


Colourful Chinese cruise liner on sea trials in the North Sea

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Bright lights and crazy colours: the Chinese cruise liner WORLD DREAM was a spectacular sight as she passed through the narrows of the River Ems in NW Germany en route from the Meyer Shipyard in Papenburg to Eemshaven. On 17 September thousands of sightseers followed the cruise liner’s passage along the Ems and were delighted when, with nighttime falling, the whole superstructure and dashingly decorated hull were bathed in the bright colours of 40,000 LEDs.

Colourful Chinese cruise liner on sea trials in the North Sea

After arriving safely in Eemshaven on 18 September, the WORLD DREAM departed for sea trials in the North Sea on September 21. This giant liner – 335 metres long, 39.7 metres wide and with a draught of 8.10 metres – will serve the rapidly expanding Chinese market on cruise holidays from China to destinations such as Vietnam and the Philippines. It is the second luxury liner Meyer has built for Dream Cruises, which is part of the Genting Group. The WORLD DREAM’s almost identical sister ship, GENTING DREAM, was handed over to Dream Cruises in September 2016.

Around 1,200 specialists are accompanying the WORLD DREAM on her sea trials to complete work on the ship’s interior fittings and furnishings, e.g. laying carpets, touching up the painting and installing the high-tech audio-visual and media equipment. “The shows passengers will enjoy on the WORLD DREAM are even more spectacular than her highly colourful exterior,” says Christoph Schnetker, a media engineer responsible for coordinating the complex interplay of audio, video, IT and lighting technology on cruise ships like the WORLD DREAM. During the current sea trials Christoph and his colleagues are working long hours to ensure this cruise liner makes dreams come true after being handed over to Dream Cruises in late October.


FleetMon at NEVA in Saint Petersburg – Russia’s Largest Maritime Trade Show

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Since 1991 St. Petersburg has been the venue for Russia’s leading B2B commercial maritime event, NEVA. FleetMon is proud to be playing a proactive role in this year’s exhibition and conference.

NEVA, the International Maritime Exhibition and Conference of Russia, has been supporting the accelerating expansion of the country’s commercial maritime industries by promoting development opportunities, products, services, designers and manufacturers as well as their cooperation with the international shipping community. This year’s bigger-than-ever and fully booked event, the 14th of its kind, takes place from September 19-22 at the exhibition and conference complex near St. Petersburg’s Pulkovo International Airport, and FleetMon will be proactively involved.

All the preparations for NEVA 2017 have now been completed and several exhibitor meetings held. The FleetMon brochures have been translated into Russian and advertising material sent off in good time.
“We can’t wait to meet visitors and other exhibitors who come to our section of the Mecklenburg-Pomerania state pavilion,” says Carsten Hilgenfeld, FleetMon’s Head of Research and Development. “We’re very much aware of how significant this event is in strengthening ties between the Russian maritime industry and international suppliers.”

From 2-4 pm on September 21 Lars Brandstaeter, FleetMon’s CEO, will be presenting a paper at a NEVA workshop. The focus of his talk – “FleetMon’s ETA and ETD data employed on the Russian market” – will be on the practical relevance of FleetMon’s world-leading AIS vessel tracking platform to the Russian maritime industries.

Visit JAKOTA Cruise Systems Ι FleetMon at the NEVA booth G2112.

Best regards from Rostock