Meet AIS Partner Andrew from Vancouver, CA

in AIS Station Update, Community by

A software developer voluntarily supporting seafarers

The home office of AIS Partner Andrew. In the background, you see the port of Vancouver and the FleetMon AIS antenna on the left.

Applying to become an AIS Partner was super easy. I just filled out the form, and shortly afterwards an AIS support member reached out to me. I sent FleetMon my shipping address, picked up the station from the post office, and connected all the components. My office has a high elevation and line-of-sight to the harbour, so I just mounted the antenna, plugged the antenna into the AIS receiver, and then plugged the receiver into my router.

Andrew, FleetMon AIS Partner from Vancouver, CN
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10 years Fehmarnbelt tunnel: an overview

in Trends, Maritime Knowledge by
Fehmarnbelt tunnel: a visionary yet controversial project

Happy 10th Anniversary, many would say. But this particular anniversary, which recalls the start of a visionary project, is somewhat different. In January 2010, a treaty was signed between the Kingdom of Denmark and the Federal Republic of Germany for the construction of a fixed link under the Fehmarnbelt, the 18 km Baltic strait running between the Danish island of Lolland and the German island of Fehmarn. Yet not everybody in Denmark or Germany feels like celebrating.

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Why does HMM build the world’s largest vessels?

in Maritime Knowledge by
HMM ALGECIRAS

South Korea is an absolute powerhouse when it comes to the shipbuilding industry. Samsung, Daewoo, and Hyundai are names that every shipping company knows, partially because every notable shipping company has at least one ship built from any of these shipyards. There’s a new company rising on the horizon, and that too has its roots deeply embedded in the South Korean lifestyle: Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM).

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Arctic Shipping: The new Gold Rush

in Trends by
Northwest Passage, Port of Los Angeles – Port of Rotterdam

Arctic shipping routes are maritime paths used to traverse the Arctic ocean. They have long been sought, even since historical times as a way to substantially reduce the travel distance between ports. But these routes cannot be traversed readily due to the presence of ice at the Arctic. With the advent of global warming and associated climate change phenomena, the Arctic ice is melting at a record pace. While this is a grim foreshadowing of things to come, a few countries stand to make a tidy profit from this, namely from the ice being replaced by navigable water. But even for these countries, do the benefits really outweigh the costs?

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Malacca Strait: China’s strategic chokepoint

in Maritime Knowledge by
Vessel traffic in the Malacca Strait via FleetMon Explorer

There’s a popular saying in the Maritime sector: Whatever happens in China, affects global shipping. Remember the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic when ports all across China were closed off? According to Alphaliner, more tonnage of container ships remained idled around the world than during the global financial crisis during this period. Daily charter rates for tankers and bulk freighters plummeted more than 70% from normal levels as China bought less oil, iron ore, and coal.

Or take a look at the country’s oil statistics:

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Shipbreaking: The last chapter of a cruise liner

in Maritime Knowledge by
MS Monarch and MS Sovereign after reaching the shipbreaking yard in Aliaga, Turkey end of July 2020

With the global pandemic and another global recession looming on the horizon, luxury is the first thing to go. The luxury cruise industry is struggling. The situation is the worst that tourism has faced since the 9/11 attacks. The idea of being confined to a tiny room in a ship infested with coronavirus is an especially unappealing image. The demands for cruise liners have sharply plummeted, many workers have been laid off and divisions shut down. Quite obviously the ships are sold as is evident from the case of Pullmantur Cruises which operated from Spain and had a substantial fleet of cruise ships. After around 150 crew members of one of the ships, the MS Horizon, tested positive for the coronavirus, the company was forced to halt operations. Its ships, the MS Sovereign and MS Monarch were stripped of valuables and sold for scrap. But what happened to the glamorous ship after it outlived its usefulness? 

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Green hydrogen in ocean-going shipping?

in Trends by
Visit the Hydrogen Europe online representing the European industry, national associations, and research centers active in the hydrogen and fuel cell sector.

As the world struggles to conquer the coronavirus and overcome the catastrophic economic impact of the pandemic, there have been frequent calls for an environmentally sustainable economic recovery and no return to the status quo a priori. Could green hydrogen and fuel cell technology propel ocean-going shipping into a sustainable, economically viable future?

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