Risk profiling increasingly important in PSC inspections

in Trends by

Port State Control (PCS) inspectors are changing the way they inspect ships and placing greater emphasis on a vessel’s risk profile, says Petros Achtypis, CEO of Cyprus-based Prevention at Sea (PaSea). PSC memoranda of understanding (MOUs) are now drawing direct parallels between the risk profile of a ship on the one hand and the performance of the ship manager and the flag-state recognised organisation (RO) on the other. This is good news for safety at sea. After all, identifying operational or management risks can help to uncover pitfalls that may lead to accidents or injury.

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Oakland woman part of mariners’ new guard

in News by

Gastcomment from columnist Carl Nolte:

It wasn’t long ago that the maritime industry was a man’s world. It was part of the culture in book, movies, songs an legends. The sea captains, sailors, explorers, naval heroes, even the pirates were all men. It was ingrained in the language: seaman, helmsman, fisherman, longshoreman, yachtsman.

The World has changed in recent years. Now there are female admirals, ship captains, ferry skippers, deckhands, marine engineers, maritime executives. At the end of the last year, Maria Secchitano of San Francisco defeated two men to be elected national president of the Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific, which represents ferry and tugboat workers. She is the first female head of a seagoing labor organization.

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e-mobility at sea – the future now in Finland

in News, Trends by

Electric road vehicles are slowly but surely making progress. According to figures published by the International Energy Agency worldwide sales were up by 40% in 2016. But an electric-powered ship – isn’t that technically impossible? A few years ago, we would have agreed, but advances in electric power storage and generation have made this emission-free dream come true – in Finland, for example. A 525-ton ferry with the appropriate name ELEKTRA (shown on the picture) is now transporting up to 375 passengers and 90 cars through the islets off the Finnish port of Turku. The batteries for this Finferries vessel were manufactured by Siemens, a company with a long tradition in electric-powered vessels with the first one built as long ago as 1886! In the Norwegian city of Trondheim Siemens employs more than 1,000 people in the development and construction of electric-powered fishing vessels, working boats and ferries. Siemens built the world’s first e-ferry, the AMPERE, in 2015 and is currently expanding its battery production facility in Trondheim.

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Tracking CO2 emissions – mandatory since 1 January

in Decarbonization, News, Trends by

On 1 January 2018 a new and mandatory dimension was added to fleet tracking: ship owners are now obliged to monitor CO2 emissions for ships exceeding 5,000 gross tons. There are good reasons.

International shipping is the only means of transportation not included in the EU’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. So monitoring CO2 emissions from ships makes environmental sense. In November 2017 an agreement was reached between the European Parliament and Council to establish a mechanism for monitoring, reporting and verifying maritime emissions. The aim of the new regulation is to improve the level of information about maritime CO2 emissions with respect to ships’ fuel consumption, transport work and energy efficiency. This will enable emissions trends and ship performance to be analysed. And in the longer term, the data gathered will allow the EU to “play an influential role in the negotiations within the International Maritime Organisation, with a view to finding ambitious solutions that combine environmental protection with development”, as Gian Luca Galletti, the Italian Environment Minister recently said.

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Filling up on LNG – Floating filling stations might be the answer

in Trends by

The number of filling stations for LNG-powered ships is limited. Germany, for example, has none. So a floating filling station like the CARDISSA is a very useful companion for the growing number of LNG-powered vessels. The CARDISSA was built in South Korea and operates as an LNG bunker ship for Shell.

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Her most recent voyage took her from Amsterdam through the Kiel Canal to the Swedish port of Nynäshamn. 2018 will see the world’s first LNG-powered cruise liner, the AIDANOVA, in operation. Its four powerful engines will generate no particulate or sulphur dioxide emissions and 80% fewer nitric oxide emissions than conventional marine diesels. That’s one reason why liquid natural gas is seen as a key factor in improving the shipping industry’s ecological footprint. Not least for this reason, Shell is planning to add another two vessels to its floating filling station fleet.

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FleetMon wins special Digital Technology Prize

in Events, Press by

At FleetMon we’re very proud to have been recently awarded the first-ever Digital Technology Prize at the annual Ludwig Bülkow Technology Awards ceremony. The significance of this award can be seen, not least, in its name giver. Ludwig Bülkow was an aeronautical pioneer whose many achievements included Germany’s first jet fighter and an innovative helicopter rotorhead. As Ludwig Bülkow was also a native of what is now Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, this German state decided to name its Technology Awards after one of its most famous sons.

 

News extract from the NDR report.

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Nano-research breakthrough in marine coatings – StartUp from Kiel won competition in China

in Research by

The barnacles, mussels and algae that get attached to ship’s hulls not only attack the vessel’s protective coating but also increase its flow resistance. Bio-fouling – to use the specialist term – can increase a ship’s fuel consumption by up to 40% and is estimated to cost the global shipping industry over US$150 bn a year. Currently, around 80,000 t of anti-fouling coatings are applied worldwide, with an overall bill for ship owners and operators coming to about US$4 bn a year. The problematic issue is that most marine coatings contain copper. As they get worn off, poisonous substances are released into the water. As a result, organostannic coatings have already been banned and copper-based coatings could well be prohibited in 2018.

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Scrub it clean! – The eco-strategies of cruise shipping lines

in Trends by

Cruise shipping is booming worldwide. Experts expect that more than 30 million people will be taking a cruise holiday by 2020 at the latest. But what about all these cruise liners’ exhaust emissions? Right now, the cleanest ships are to be found in US waters and the Baltic Sea where scrubbers are playing an increasingly important role in the eco-strategies of cruise shipping lines such as TUI Cruises.

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Cutting cruise ships’ emissions in ports – Hamburg shows how

in Decarbonization, Trends by

The alarming levels of air pollution in big cities like Delhi or Beijing and “dirty diesels” – emissions of nitrogen oxides from automotive diesel engines – have made many headlines in recent months. But in port cities like Kiel, Hamburg or Rostock there is an additional air pollutant: particulate emissions from ship’s diesels. In the booming segment of cruise shipping – a 10% increase in arrivals in Hamburg alone this year – the focus is increasingly on how emissions from cruise ships’ auxiliary diesel engines can be reduced. During a 10-hour stay in port, the diesel engines of a single cruise ship may well burn 20 metric tons of fuel and produce 60 metric tons of CO2 – about as much as the total annual emissions of 25 average-sized European cars! This problem can be tackled in at least two ways: by supplying cruise ships with shore-side power so the auxiliary engines can be switched off, or powering the vessels with low-emission liquefied natural gas (LNG).

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EMERALD STAR sinks – liquefaction the cause?

in News by

The sinking of the EMERALD STAR in stormy seas off in the Philippine Sea on October 13 ( https://www.fleetmon.com/maritime-news/2017/20043/bulk-carrier-emerald-star-reported-capsized-and-sa/ ) has once again raised the issue of liquefaction as a high risk factor for bulk carriers. The EMERALD STAR was sailing from Indonesia to China with a cargo of nickel ore. There is little doubt that liquefaction was the main cause of the ship capsizing, as the circumstances are similar to the sinking of the BULK JUPITER some years ago. In such tragic situations one question has to be asked: Did the Master of the EMERALD STAR know the true moisture content of his cargo? He would have been entitled to refuse loading or sailing if he believed the cargo was dangerous. But how was he to know?

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