Is the Shipping Sector on Track to Meet Climate Targets?

in Decarbonization, Research, Trends by

FleetMon supports ETH researchers to find the answer.

Fighting climate change demands action in all sectors. International shipping faces the challenge of long lifetimes of vessels compared to other modes of transportation. Decisions on energy carriers and propulsion technologies that are made now have a long-lasting impact on the emissions of the sector. 

A research group at the Institute of Energy Technology at ETH Zürich led by Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Boulouchos developed a fleet turnover model for the shipping sector to estimate its future CO2 emissions up to 2050. Thereby, the CO2 emissions of existing ships and those of new ships entering the fleet yield yearly emission figures. However, up until recently, a missing puzzle piece for such models has been how long existing ships will actually still be in service. Missing or prohibitively expensive data has prevented analyses on this topic.

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Maritime Domain Awareness in the Philippines

in News, Community by

National Coast Watch Center: A Look at the country’s Maritime Inter-Agency Set-Up

Maritime domain awareness (MDA) is defined by the International Maritime Organization as the effective understanding of anything associated with the maritime domain that could impact the security, safety, economy, or environment. The maritime domain is defined as all areas and things of, on, under, relating to, adjacent to, or bordering on a sea, ocean, or other navigable waterway, including all maritime-related activities, infrastructure, people, cargo, and vessels and other conveyances.

We received the following article by Ely Loyd A. Villarosa, currently the Senior Intelligence Analyst of the Philippines’ National Coast Watch Center: The article is about the Philippines’ National Coast Watch Center, the only government agency that caters inter-agency mechanisms for maritime security operations.  The NCWC was funded by the US government through the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

In 2011, then-President Benigno S. Aquino III signed Executive Order No. 57 creating the National Coast Watch System as the central inter-agency mechanism for a coordinated and coherent approach on maritime issues and maritime security operations towards enhancing governance in the Philippines’ maritime domain.  One of its organs is the National Coast Watch Center, the implementing and operating arm of the System. 

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Suez Crisis Highlights Fragility of Global Supply Chain

in Trends by

First came the pandemic in 2020, something that roiled shipping and disrupted the supply chains in and out of China, which soon spread out to the rest of the world like wildfire. And then came one of the biggest hurdles the logistics industry has faced in years, the closure of the Suez Canal, dubbed by some as a ‘crisis’ and rightly so.

An estimated 12% of the world’s trade passes through the Suez Canal daily, representing almost $10 billion in trade on a good day as per Llyod’s List. Serving as the link between rising Asian powerhouses and relatively wealthier Europe, it is undoubtedly the most important waterway in the world.

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Green Ammonia – the Key to Decarbonizing Shipping?

in Decarbonization, Trends by

There’s no doubting the magnitude of the problem. And the urgent need to tackle it. Maritime shipping accounts for nearly 3% of the world’s annual CO2 emissions, says the IMO. In 2018, IMO delegates agreed to cut emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050. But with less than three decades to go, the target seems more unattainable than ever. Developing viable alternatives to diesel fuel is a more time-critical challenge than ever before. Can green ammonia solve shipping’s carbon crisis?

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Suez Blockage Puts World’s Supply Chain at Risk

in Trends by

There’s no denying that the Suez Canal is the world’s most important waterway. The reason: about 12% of the global trade flowing through a single canal, one connecting two continents – Asia and Europe. The canal is so strategic that world powers have fought over the waterway since it was completed in 1869.

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Ship Spotter Spotlight: Joana from Germany

in Community by

In 2021, we started to put the spotlight on our passionate ship spotters. Each month, we introduce another ship spotter of FleetMon.com. In April, you’ll meet Joana (User name: Joanapen), an inland skipper from Bavaria, Germany.

What is your maritime background?

My name is Joana; I‘m 60 years old and live in a small village in the Dachau district near Munich, Germany. I am an inland skipper by profession, mainly driving as a pilot on the Danube between Straubing and Vilshofen. I shoot vessels once a week. From time to time, I also go to other waters as a replacement (vacation or illness replacement) for about 14 days.

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FleetMon Maritime Gallery March 2021

in Community by

Welcome to the first edition of the FleetMon Maritime Gallery. Each month, you’ll find a special section on our blog featuring the best maritime photos in a certain category. You’ll not only get to view the most popular photos being voted by our community for “Photo of the Week” and “Photo of the Month”. You also have the chance to view special shots and photos which are less popular but in the same way extraordinary.

This month, we’ll start with showcasing a selection of the best tugboat photos in our monthly Maritime Gallery. Enjoy great vessel photography!

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Bay of Biscay: The Deathbed of Ships

in Maritime Knowledge by
Cliffs of the Bay of Biscay, Image by ttzarza from Pixabay 

The French philosopher Voltaire gave this as a reference to the famed shipwrecks in the Bay of Biscay, a gulf of the northeast Atlantic Ocean located south of the Celtic Sea, off the coast of Spain.

The history of human navigation extensively documented shipwrecks off the infamous Spanish Bay, known to many as “The Valley of Death,” “The Vomiting Venus,” and “The Trunk of the Atlantic U-Boat Menace.”

Albeit with the advent of modern technology, improved vessel route prediction, as well as improvements in vessel designing, the number of fatalities in the Bay has considerably reduced. But this shouldn’t stop us from delving into the past! But before we do that, let’s explore the historical context so you know just why the Bay became so infamous among the sailing community back in the days.

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